We've previously covered what Apogee is and how it's deployed, so all that's left to cover is the technology used to build it. As a refresher: Apogee is a Google Sheets Add-on we built to help our Auctions Ops team transform the data given to us by our partners into a format that our CMS can understand. This process, done manually up until now, takes a long time and is a perfect candidate for automation.

Apogee had some really interesting technical challenges that I enjoyed solving, and I'm excited to share some lessons I learned. So let's dive in!

Read on →

Apogee: the point in the orbit of two objects at which they are furthest apart.

In 2017, the Artsy Auctions Operations team coordinated and ran 190+ sales on our platform. This year, our ambitions are set even higher. But scaling up the number of sales we run will require scaling up our tools and processes, too. This post describes Apogee, a tool I built to help us scale our businesses processes. I never thought I would be so excited to build a spreadsheet plugin, but I honestly had a blast. So let's dive in!

Read on →

I was really excited about CircleCI 2.0, especially the workflows features. It seemed to me that with the work they had done here, really complicated builds would be able to be configured in a way that made more sense than on 1.0. This was something that was causing me grief on one of our projects so I upgraded to 2.0. It was pretty hard to get green and once we did, we decided to downgrade back to 1.0. Here's why.

Read on →

C4Q is C4Q is a non-for-profit hacker school based in NYC. We've had members of the Artsy team help out by being TAs, running committees and steering the curriculum as Engineers in the industry for many years. In 2017, C4Q reached out to arrange a meetup between Artsy engineers and students who were learning Android and Web development. This year we ran a panel for the other half of the C4Q students who study iOS and Web.

We got an entirely new set of panelists to cover similar topics as last time - so if you're wondering what it's like in the industry, and what makes an Artsy engineer. The video is after the link.

Read on →

In Modernizing Force we discussed some of the tools we've been working with to modernize Artsy.net's development environment, from introducing Babel and React to the creation of @artsy/stitch. Increasing overall development speed was another aim, and to that end we released @artsy/express-reloadable which automatically hot-swaps Express.js code without the restart. In this post I'd like to cover some of the issues we've faced since then, and in particular our solution to library code-sharing in Express apps.

Read on →

Hello! My name is Ash and I work on the Auctions team at Artsy. I like to blog, and I like to tell people they should blog, too (you should blog btw). I've been trying to increase how many blog posts get written by Artsy engineers for six months or so, but have only seen modest results. I've been holding weekly office hours to help with writing, but it's not often attended. So I started reaching out to team members individually to suggest they write something, but they're very busy and often can't spare the time. Hmm.

A simple solution came out of a discussion with other engineering teams surrounding how to build team culture. Sonam Dhingra of UsTwo solves the problem of "not enough blog posts are getting written" simply by providing templates that can be used to compose blog posts very quickly. Even if someone was in a hurry or not a confident writer, they could still contribute to the engineering blog. What a marvelous idea!

Read on →

At Artsy we <3 TypeScript. We use it with React Native via Emission and on the web via Reaction. Until recently, however, projects that required the use of Babel had to implement convoluted tooling pipelines in order to work with the TypeScript compiler, increasing friction in an already complex landscape. (An example of this is Emission's use of Relay, which requires babel-plugin-relay to convert graphql literals into require calls.) Thankfully, those days are over. Read on for an example project, as well as some advice on how to avoid common pitfalls when working with the new beta version of Babel 7.

Read on →

C4Q is is a non-for-profit hacker school based in NYC. We've had members of the Artsy team help out by being TAs, running committees and steering the curriculum as Engineers in the industry for many years. C4Q recently reached out to arrange a meetup between Artsy engineers and students who are learning Android and Web development.

We thought it would be cool to have a talk from dB, our CTO, on what Artsy is and to also host a Q&A panel with our engineers. For a lot of the students it was their first time meeting a team of engineers, so we anticipated a lot of question time.

In prepration for the event, I reached out to the internet for ideas on what sort of questions juniors would be interested in hearing about, and people said they were also interested in hearing what we ended up being asked, and what our answers were. This post has the youtube video of the opening talk, and our panel's Q & A session.

It was really awesome to talk about how far we've grown as individuals, and what is important in our engineering lives.

Read on →